A Text-book of the History of Doctrines

Przednia okładka
Sheldon, 1861
1 recenzji
Nie weryfikujemy opinii, ale staramy się wykrywać i usuwać fałszywe treści

Z wnętrza książki

Co mówią ludzie - Napisz recenzję

Nie znaleziono żadnych recenzji w standardowych lokalizacjach.

Spis treści

Importance of the History of Doctrines
23
Arrangement of the Materials
25
Division into Periods 26 L
26
a Public Sources
30
b Private Sources
33
Indirect Sources
36
FIRST PERIOD FROM THE APOSTOLIC AGE TO THE DEATH OF ORIGEN OR FROM THE YEAR 80 TO THE YEAR 254
43
The Apostles
45
Culture of the Age and Philosophy
49
Rule of FaithThe Apostles Creed
51
Heresies
52
Judaism and Ethnicism
54
Ebionites and CerinthusDocetæ and Gnostics
55
Montanism and Monarchianism
60
The Catholic Doctrine
62
The Theology of the Fathers
63
The general Doctrinal Character of this Period
74
B SPECIAL HISTORY OF DOCTRINES DURING THE FIRST PERIOD FIRST DIVISION APOLOGETICODOGMATIO PROLEGOMENA TRUTH...
75
Mode of Argument
77
Sources of Knowledge
82
Canon of the Sacred Scriptures
83
Inspiration and Efficacy of the Scriptures
86
Biblical Interpretation
92
Tradition
95
SECOND DIVISION THEOLOGY THE DOCTRINE RESPECTING GOD INCLUDING THE DOCTRINE OF THE CREATION AND GOVERNME...
99
The Unity of God
102
Whether God can be Known
104
Idealism and AnthropomorphismCorporeity of God
106
The Attributes of God
109
a Before the Christian Era and in other Systems
113
The Christian Doctrine of the Logos in the Writings of John
116
The Theologumenon of the Church concerning the Logos to the Times of Origen
117
Origens Doctrine of the Logos
123
The Holy Ghost
125
The Triad
128
Monarchianism and Subordination
130
Doctrine of the Creation
133
Providence and Government of the World
136
Angelology and Demonology
138
The Angels
139
The Devil and Demons
142
The same subject continued
145
THIRD DIVISION ANTHROPOLOGY PAGE 53 Introduction
148
Division of Human Nature and practical Psychology
149
Origin of the Soul
151
The Image of God
153
a Liberty
155
Immortality
158
Sin the Fall and its Consequences
159
60 The Doctrine of Sin in General
160
Interpretation of the Narrative of the Fall
162
State of Innocence and Fall
163
The Effects of the Fall
164
FOURTH DIVISION CHRISTOLOGY AND SOTERIOLOGY 64 Christology in General
169
The GodMan
170
Further Development of this Doctrine
173
The Sinlessness of Christ
178
The Resurrection
217
General Judgment Hades Purgatory Conflagration of the World 221
224
FROM THE DEATH OF ORIGEN TO JOHN DAMASCENUS FROM
228
Alexandria and Antioch
239
The Consubstantiality of the Son with the Father Sabellius and Paul
246
94 Procession of the Holy Spirit
262
Final Statement of the Doctrine of the Trinity
264
Tritheism Tetratheism
267
Symbolum Quicumque
269
b CHRISTOLOGY 8 98 The True Humanity of Christ Traces of Docetism Arianism
271
The Doctrine of Apollinaris
272
Nestorianism
275
EutychianMonophysite Controversy
277
Progress of the Controversy Theopaschites
279
Various Modifications of the Monophysite Doctrine Aphthartodocetæ Phthartolatri Agnoëtæ
281
The Doctrine of Two Wills in Christ Monothelites
282
Practical and Religious Importance of Christology during this Period
284
SECOND DIVISION DOCTRINES RESPECTING ANTHROPOLOGY 8 106 On Man in general
286
On the Doctrine of Sin in general
290
Consequences of the First Sin and Freedom of the Will according to the Theologians of the Greek Church
293
The Opinions of the Latin Theologians before Augustine and of Augustine before the Pelagian Controversy
295
The Pelagian Controversy
296
Sin Original Sin and its Consequences
298
Liberty and Grace
301
Predestination
303
Semipelagianism and the later Teachers of the Church
305
SECOND CLASS CHURCH DOCTRINES WHICH WERE EITHER NOT CONNECTED OR BUT RE MOTELY WITH THE HERESIES OF THE A...
311
Writings in Defence of Christianity
313
Miracles and Prophecy
314
Sources of Religious Knowledge Bible and Tradition
315
The Canon
317
Inspiration and Interpretation
319
Tradition and the Continuance of Inspiration
323
The Doctrine concerning God 8 123 The Being of God
325
The Nature of God
327
The Unity of God
330
The Attributes of God
331
Creation
332
The Relation of the Doctrine of Creation to the Doctrine of the Trinity
334
Theodicy
337
Angelology and Angelolatry
338
The same subject continued
341
Devil and Demons
342
Soteriology 134 Redemption through Christ The Death of Jesus
345
The Church and its Means of Grace 135 The Doctrine about the Church
352
The Sacraments
355
Baptism
356
The Lords Supper
361
The Doctrine of the Last Things 139 Millennarianism The Kingdom of Christ
368
The Resurrection of the Body
369
General Judgment Conflagration of the World Purgatory
373
The State of the Blessed and the Damned
376
FROM JOHN DAMASCENUS TO THE AGE OF THE REFORMATION FROM
381
B SPECIAL HISTORY OF DOCTRINES DURING THE THIRD PERIOD
414
THEOLOGY
432
ber The Omnipresence Eternity and Unity of God
445
Prawa autorskie

Inne wydania - Wyświetl wszystko

Kluczowe wyrazy i wyrażenia

Popularne fragmenty

Strona 405 - I apeak as a fool,' that, next to the Bible and St. Augustine, no book hath ever come into my hands whence I have learnt, or would wish to learn, more of what God and Christ, and man, and all things, are...
Strona 369 - Et rursus, quoniam perfectis operibus requievit die septimo eumque benedixit, necesse' est, ut in fine sexti millesimi anni malitia omnis aboleatur e terra et regnet per annos mille justitia, sitque tranquillitas et requies a laboribus, quos mundus jamdiu perfert...
Strona 280 - Qui licet deus sit et homo, non duo tarnen, sed unus est Christus...
Strona 363 - Eucharistie doctrine is specially noteworthy; he asserts emphatically the identity of the bread and wine with the body and blood of Christ, going so far as to say that Christ drank of his own blood at the Institution.
Strona 332 - Deus non alicubi est ; quid enim alicubi est, continetur loco, quid loco continetur, corpus est. Non igitur alicubi est, et tamen quia est et in loco non est, in illo sunt potius omnia, quam ipse alicubi.
Strona 109 - Divine affections are ascribed to the Deity by means of figures borrowed from the human form, not as if he were indued with corporeal qualities : when eyes are ascribed to him, it denotes that he sees all things; when ears, that he hears all things; the speech denotes the will ; nostrils, the perception of prayer ; hands, creation ; arms, power ; feet, immensity ; for he has no members, and performs no office for which they aro required, but executes all things by the sole act of his will.
Strona 108 - Quis enim negabit Deum corpus esse, etsi Deus spiritus est? Spiritus enim corpus sui generis in sua effigie.
Strona 146 - ... not try those that are full, because he knows that they are good, but tastes those that are half full, lest they should grow sour; (for vessels half full soon grow sour, and lose the taste of wine:) so the devil comes to the servants of God to try them.
Strona 314 - Portentum ergo fit non contra naturam, sed contra quam est nota natura.
Strona 333 - Thus he said, in reference to the six days: Qui dies cujusmodi sint, aut perdifficile nobis, aut etiam impossibile est cogitare, quanto magis dicere, De Civ.

Informacje bibliograficzne