The Works of Sir William Temple, Bart: An essay upon the advancement of trade in Ireland. Of popular discontents. An introduction to the history of England. Of gardening. An essay upon the cure of the gout by moxa. Of health and long life. Of heroic virtue. Of poetry. An essay upon ancient and modern learning. Thoughts upon reviewing that essay. Of the excesses of grief. Of the different conditions of life and fortune. Heads of an essay on conversation. Poetry

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F.C. and J. Rivington, 1814
 

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Strona 450 - That among so many things as are by men possessed or pursued in the course of their lives, all the rest are baubles, besides old wood to burn, old wine to drink, old friends to converse with, and old books to read.
Strona 482 - The thing that hath been, it is that which shall be; and that which is done is that which shall be done: and there is no new thing under the sun. Is there any thing whereof it may be said, See, this is new ? it hath been already of old time, which was before us.
Strona 433 - in me iacis ? est auctor quis denique eorum 80 vixi cum quibus? absentem qui rodit amicum, qui non defendit alio culpante, solutos qui captat risus hominum famamque dicacis, fingere qui non visa potest, commissa tacere qui nequit, hie niger est, hunc tu, Romane, caveto.
Strona 441 - When all is done, human life is, at the greatest and the best, but like a froward child, that must be played with and humoured a little to keep it quiet till it falls asleep, and then the care is over.
Strona 271 - Give strong drink unto him that is ready to perish, and wine unto those that be of heavy hearts. Let him drink and forget his poverty and remember his misery no more.
Strona 212 - For this reason Epicurus passed his life wholly in his garden: there he studied, there he exercised, there he taught his philosophy; and, indeed, no other sort of abode seems to contribute so much to both the tranquillity of mind and indolence of body, which he made his chief ends.
Strona 434 - The academy set up by Cardinal Richelieu, to amuse the wits of that age and country, and divert them from raking into his politics and ministry, brought this into vogue ; and the French wits have, for this last age, been wholly turned to the refinement of their style and language ; and, indeed, with such success, that it can hardly be equalled, and runs equally through their verse and their prose.
Strona 241 - The measure of choosing well is whether a man likes what he has chosen, which, I thank God, has befallen me; and though among the follies of my life, building and planting have not been the least, and have cost me...
Strona 234 - ... fountains, and waterworks. If the hill had not ended with the lower garden, and the wall were not bounded by a common way that goes through the park, they might have added a third quarter of all greens ; but this want is supplied by a garden on the other side of the house, which is all of that sort, very wild, shady, and adorned with rough rockwork and fountains.
Strona 213 - ... of forest, either found there before it was inclosed or planted after; either cultivated like gardens, for shades and for walks, with fountains or streams, and all sorts of plants usual in the climate and pleasant to the eye, the smell, or the taste; or else employed, like our parks, for inclosure and harbour of all sorts of wild beasts, as well as for the pleasure of riding and walking: and so they were of more or less extent, and of different entertainment, according to the several humours...

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