Obrazy na stronie
PDF
ePub
[ocr errors]

Acup.

GAELIC.

LATIN.

ENGLISH
Coinbhliochd, Conflictum, A conflict.
Cointin,

Contentio, Contention.
Cointinneach, Contentiosus, Contentious.
Coiriptheachd, Corruptio, Corruption.
Coiripam, Currumpo, To corrupt.
Coiripthe,
Corruptus,

Corrupted.
Coirt, Cort, Cortex,

Bark.
Coisreacam, Consecro,

To consecrate.
Coisreacan, Consecratio, Consecration,
Coisreactha,

Consecratus, Consecrated.
Colum,
Columba,

A dove.
Columhan, Columna,

A column.
Compraid, Comparatio, Comparison.
Commun,

Communio, Communion.
Con-chliud,
Conclusio,

Conclusion,
Con-gnamh,
Co-gnavus,

An assistant, help.
Con-graidhe, Con-gradus, Relationship
Cong-bhalas, Con-vallum, A buttress.
Contrardha, Contrarius, Contrary.
Coron,
Corona,

A crown.
Corp,
Corpus,

A body.
Cre, Cread, Creditum,

A creed.
Creatoir, Creatuir, Creatura,

A creature.
Creithir,

Crater,
Creuchd, Creud, Crudumi, Cruor,

A wound, gore
Criosd,
Christus,

Christ.
Croch, Croc, Croceus,

Saffron coloured.
Croinic,
Chronicum,

A chronicle.
Crois,
Crux,

A cross.
Cru,
Cruor,

Gore,
Cuban,
Cubo,

To lye down, bend.
Cubhad,
Cubitus,

A cubit.
Cupull,
Copula,

A couple, rafter.
Cupla,
Copula,

A pair.
Cuplam,
Copulo,

To couple, pair.
Cursa,
Cursus,

A course.
Cursuir,
Cursor,

A messenger, runner.
Cust,
Cutis,

The skin.
Da,
Duo,

Two.
Daibhie,
David,

David.
Damnam,
Damno,

To condemn.
Damnadh,

Damnatio, Condemning.,
Damanta,

Damnatus, Condemned.
Deachdam, Dicto,

To dictate.
Deachdoir, Dictator, A dictator.
Deachmhaidh, Decimæ,

Tythes.
Deachtoir,

Doctor,

A teacher.
Deacanach, Deganus,

A dean.
Deic, Deich,

Decem,

Ten.
Deico, Deicho, Decimus,

Tenth.
Deilf, Delf, Delphin,

A dolphin.

GAL

GAELIC.

LATIN.

ENGLISH.
Deisciobal,

Discipulus, A disciple.
Deiscreide,
Discretio,

Discretion.
Deisidham,
Desideo,

To rest, be idle.
Dia,
Deus,

God.
Diu,
Dies,

A day.
Dia Domhnuich, Dies Dominicus, Sunday.
Dia Luain,
Dies Lunæ,

Monday.
Dia Mairt,

Dies Martis, Tuesday.
Dia Sathuirne,

Dies Saturni, Saturday.
Diabhal,
Diabolus,

The devil
Dibheal,
Debilis,

Weak.
Difir,
Differentia,

Difference.
Diong,
Dignus,

Worthy.
Direach,
Directus,

Upright.
Dirighamn,
Dirigo,

To direct.
Diuc,
Dux,

A duke, leader.
Diur,
Durus,

Hard.
Dochta,
Doctus,

Taught.
Dolas,
Dolor,

Grief.
Dom,
Domus,

A house.
Dom-Airm,
Domus armorum,

An

armoury.
Draic, Dracy Draco,

A dragon.
Dubuilte,

Duplicatus, Doubled.
Eabur,
Ebur,

Ivory.
Each, Eac, Ec, Equus,

A horse.
Eadailh, Eatailh, Italia,

Italy.
Eaglais, Eaclais, Ecclesia,

A church,
Angulus,

A corner.
Eannec,
Innocuus,

Innocent.
Eanuc,
Eunuchus,

An eunucb.
Earc,
Arx,

A tower, heaven. 1. July 1808,

Eang,

MILO

Plan of a Monument to Thomson. THE "HE first appearance of Thomson, ornament and illustration, was scarce

as the author of “ The Seasons," ly thought capable of constituting was honoured with the distinguished the whole, or even the principal part attention of the most eminently litera- of a long poem. It was reserved for ry and political characters of his age, Thomson to shew to the world, what and is now universally acknowledged genius and taste like his can accomto have formed an æra in the Annals plish. With a mind capable of attenof Poetry. Destined to become the ding alike to what is vast, and to what model of future descriptive poets, he is minute, he has traced in his “ Seaat once formed a style peculiarly his sons,” (the earliest and noblest proown, and carried it to a degree of per duction of his Muse,) a progressive sefection hitherto unrivalled. Before ries of descriptions, as parts of the wonthe publication of “The Seasons," the derful and interesting whole, formed description of natural objects, though by the annual vicissitudes of Nature. it served the subordinate purposes of To the charms of poctic diction

and

and picturesque imagery, this compo- he inculcates, and his ardent zeal for sition adds the more commanding the liberty and happiness of his coungraces of philosophic thought, and re- try. ligious coutemplation. By connect- The reputation of Thomson, as the ing the progress of arts and sciences, author of “ The Seasons," has been with the delineation of rural manners, found to increase with the lapse of and the description of external nature, years. This fact, while it is the surest as well as by his frequent allusions to test of the truth of that judgment characters and events in ancient and which his contemporaries formed of modern history, Thomson has diver- his merit, is also the best pledge of the sified his Poem in a manner equally continuance of his fame. It cannot, new and delightful : while, by the therefore, be doubted, that his works sublime conceptions of the Author of will form the most permanent memoNature, which pervade his work, he rial of his genius, and that the poem has caused his descriptive poetry to ri- of “ The Seasons," in particular, which val the highest efforts of the Epic is founded on the unfading beauties of Muse. His “ Seasons" may as truly nature, will be read and admired so be said to be a religious as a descrip- long as the language and literature of tive Poem; and, while his devotional our country shall remain. sentiments are in perfect unison with It has been long a subject of rethe subject of his work, being equal- gret to the admirers of the Poet, that ly remote from enthusiasm and super- no public monument has been consestition, they tend at once to elevate crated to his memory in the vicinity the mind, and to improve the heart. of Ednam, his native village : and, as The sublime Hymn, which closes the “ The Seasons" continues to be one of Poem, and which may be regarded as the most popular poems in the Engbringing into one point of view, the lish language, after having stood the wonders of Nature, and their great test of criticism for the greater part of Author, is a production of such tran- a century, this regret is still felt with scendent merit, and so admirably cal- undiminished force. culated to awaken the noblest feelings The pleasure enjoyed by cultivated of our nature, that, had he never writ- minds in visiting classical ground has ten another line, we should have con- often been remarked : and the glow ceived him to merit the gratitude and of admiration is felt in its full force, admiration of posterity.

when we approach the spot where the Congenial with this devotional spi- Hero, the Philosopher, or the Poet, rit, is the gentleness and benevolence first opened his eyes to the light of with which his heart overflows towards heaven. Thomson has himself expresman, and the whole animal creation. sed the influence of this association of These qualities are so exquisitely inter- ideas, when, near the opening of his woven with every part of the Poem, as poem of “ Liberty," describing himto give to it the most tender interest self as contemplating the ruins of anin the minds of readers of taste and cient Rome, he says, sensibility; and the concurring testimony of those who knew him, affords “ Musing I lay, warm from the sacred

walks, reason to believe, that, in this respect, Where at each step imagination burns." the productions of the Poet were a genuine transcript of the character of There is a more than ordinary four the Man. Nor ought we to omit to dation for this feeling of the mind in mention, as a striking excellence in his the case of the descriptive Poet ; for dramatic and other poetical works, as it is his business to adorn the charms the spirit of manly independence which of poetic diction the images borrowed

from

from extemal nature, and the senti- they cherish a degree of confidence in ments connected with these, so it may the success of their application, which well be supposed, that the character naturally arises from their having ob(as gay, picturesque, or sublime,) of served, that the discerning liberality ihose scenes which first aitract his at- of the public has, in this enlightened içation, may, in some measure, give age and country, been proportioned to their own colouring to his fancy, and the occasions which have required its regulate the current of his genius. exercise. No specific plan for the While, therefore, we contemplate such Monument has yet been adopted, tho' cenes as these, and view in them the several sketches have been made; and objects which first inspired the youth- it would indeed be premature to fix fal Bard, we are more sensibly affec- upon any, till the amount of the sums ied, than by a narration of his life, or subscribed may enable the Society to even a perusal of his compositions. proportion the undertaking to the When the mind is in a frame like this, means of effecting it. hors delightful is it to observe, that Several eminences in the neighbours the memory of the Bard is preserved hood of Ednam command a prospect from oblivion, amidst his native haunts, richly diversified with natural beauties, and that public sympathy is there pre- and would afford a most appropriate sented with an object to rivet its at- situation for a Monument to the Poet tention, and to command its respect! of the “ Seasons." We have the sa

We feel, therefore, peculiar satisfac- tisfaction also of being assured, that tion in announcing to the public, that more than one proprietor will most a subscription is at length opened for cheerfully set apart such a portion of the purpose of erecting a Monument ground as may be requisite for this on some commanding situation in the purpose. The accomplishment of the immediate vicinity of Ednam. The object may now therefore be antici. accomplishment of this design, which pated, in a manner, which may renhas been contemplated for several years der it worthy of being associated with by the Society of Gentlemen, who the name it is meant to honour, and of met annually at Ednam to celebrate being regarded as a lasting memorial the birth of the Poet, will now, it is of the gratitude and respect of the Brihoped, proceed without further inter- tish public. ruption or delay. But it is obvious, Lists of the Committee appointed that to render a proper tribute of re to conduct the business, and of the spect to his memory, cannot be expec- Subscriptions already received, are anted to be the work of the limited cir- nexed : cle of individuals, who are either Members of the Committee. members of that Society, or whose re Sir Alexander Don, Baronet; sidence happens to be in the neigh- Sir Henry Hay Macdougal, Bart. bourhood of Ednam. These

Sir George Douglas, Bart. deed be expected to feel the warmest George Baillie, Esq. M. P. in.erest in the success of the plan, and Walter Scott, Esq.

Lieut. Col. Robertson ; to take the most active part in conducting it to its completion ; but the Robe-t Walker, Esq. Wooden';

George Waldie, Esq. Hendersyde; assistance of the Public is indispen- Dr Douglas, Kelso; sably necessary

Rev. Robert Lundie, Kelso, Secretary: To the opulent inhabitants of Scot. Names of Subscribers, in the Order in wbich land, therefore, and to the friends of

they hare been received. genius through the United Kingdom, George Waldie, Esq. of Hen. they feel themselves obliged to apply

}

may in

cersyde for pecuniary aid; and, in doing so, R. Walker, Esq. of Wooden

Rober

10 10

5 5 0

IO 10

оооо

3

Robert Davidson, Esq. of} s so

George Baillie, Esq. of Jer.
Pinnacle Hill

}

wood, M. P Lieut. Col, Robertson

Walter Scott, Esq.

5 5 Js. Potts, Esq. of Kelso Bank 5

5

Andrew Wilson, M. D. Kelso 3 3 Mr Haldane, Broomlands 3

Mr Js. Ballantyne, Edinburgh s 5 Rev. R. Lundie, Kelso 5 S Frs. C. Scott, Esq. Rosebank 3 3 A. Thomson, Minister of

W. Waite, Esq. Castielaw 5 5 Sprouston, (now one of 3 3 T. Mein, Esq. Greenwells

5 5 the Ministers of Perth)

J. Seton Kari, Esq. Kippilaw 5 5 o R. Robertson, Minr. of Ednam 2 Mr W. Riddell, Jedburgh John Waldie, Esq. younger?

Mr Alex. Ballantyne, Kelso of Hendersyde :

5 5

Sir William Forbes, Bart. Mr P. Robertson, Ednam

Mr J. Ballantyne, Edinburghi James Douglas, M. D. Kelso 5

5 Dr. Brewster, Edinburgh Sir James Pringle, Bart.

Sir Richard Phillips · Sir H. H. M.Dougal, Bart.

Sir Alexander Don, Bart, • 10 IO Sir George Douglas, Bart.

Hon. Gilbert Elliot, of Minto 10 10

o

[ocr errors]

. - I

I

ооооооооооооооо

1

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

1

IO 10

IO 10

Quantity of Waste Lands in the different Counties of SCOTLAND.

Number of
County.
Statement, on what founded. Distinction of Lands.

Acres. Aberdeen County Report, p. 127 Unimproved lands

$74,400

S Wastes and mountainous Argyle General information

districts

{787,785
Ayr
Ditto
Moorish waste

218,451
Banff
Ditto
Wastes and hills

290,000 Berwick County Report, p. 19. Mour, moss, &c.

126,000 Bute, and the rest? Hebrides Rep. p. 60 Moors, wastes, &c.

2,880,000 of the Hebrides Caithness County Report

Wastes and commons

368,000 Clydesdale County Report, p. 71 Moors, &c.

250,000 Clackmanan General information Wastes and moors

25,000 Dumbarton Ditto

Wastes

164,966 Dumfries Ditto

Wastes and commons

200,000 Elgio Ditto Ditto

350,000 Fife County Report, p. 1 Hill, moss, &c.

64,000 Forfar Ditto, p. 1

Wastes, in English acres 71,875 overness General information 5-6ths waste

1,694,935 Kinross Ditto Wastes

25,200 Kirkcudbright Galloway Report, p. 1 2-3ds waste, in Engl, acres 366,734 East General information Wastes

55,000 Lothian County Report, p. 5 Ditto, in English acres

14,336 Mid Ditto, p. 7 1-3d waste

76,800 Mearns General information Wastes and commons

164,266 Nairn Ditto Ditto

10,000 Orkney Ditto Ditto

700,000 Perth Ditto 15-6ths waste +

1,321,600 Renfrew Ditto 1-6th ditto

94,535 Ross and Cromarty Ditto

5-6ths ditto

1,480,000 Roxburgh County Report, p. 58 Heath and hill pasture 250,000 Selkirk Ditro, p. 15 Ditto, in English acres

145,000 Stirling General information Wastes and commons

120,000 Sutherland Ditto

5-6ths waste

1,232,000 Tweeddale County Report, p. 1 Wastes, in English acres 169,360 Wigton 'Galloway Report, p. 1 Moorlands, ditto

198,93Total in Scotland ... 14,218,294

The Exclusive of 1000 square miles, or 640,000 acres of rock and sand.

+ There must be an error here. Total of the county, 4,068,610 ; 5 6chs of this would be 3,390,530.

[graphic]
[ocr errors]
« PoprzedniaDalej »