Reflections on the Revolution in France

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Anchor Press/Doubleday, 1973 - 515
Edmund Burke was a statesman and philosopher who favored gradual reform over revolution. Arguing that the ideology behind the French Revolution was too ephemeral, he predicted a disastrous outcome. Well regarded by the liberals of his day for his support of constitutional limitations on sovereign authority, his condemnation of religious persecution, and his sympathy for the grievances of the American colonists, Burke also gained the respect of conservatives when he published his "Reflections on the Revolution in France" in 1790. One of Paine's greatest and most widely read works, considered a classic statement of faith in democracy and egalitarianism, defends the early events of the French Revolution, supports social security for workers, public employment for those in need of work, abolition of laws limiting wages, and other social reforms.

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Born in Ireland in 1729, Edmund Burke was an English statesman, author, and orator who is best remembered as a formidable advocate for those who were victims of injustice. He was the son of a Dublin lawyer and had also trained to practice law. In the 1760s, Burke was elected to the House of Commons from the Whig party. Burke spent most of his career in Parliament as a member of the Royal Opposition, who was not afraid of controversy, as shown by his support for the American Revolution and for Irish/Catholic rights. His best-known work is Reflections on the French Revolution (1790). Some other notable works are On Conciliation with the American Colonies (1775) and Impeachment of Warren Hastings (1788). Edmund Burke died in 1797.

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