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lascia passare for fashionable life, you enter the court, with a matron's tiara of diamonds encircling your brow, and the passport of beauty, rank, and fashion, signed by Hymen's coronet. And with all this, and other “ appliances to boot,” you hesitate; and think, pretty innocent! that, because you do not love him who is to bestow, you ought to decline them! This is really being romantic en verité! Lady Delaward herself, your Minerva, could not betray a more absolute and fantastic delicacy. Lord Annandale is un homme du monde ; amusing, and willing to be amused; with no inconsiderable portion of vanity, and with a mind

that refers all his own actions and those of

others to the opinion of that society whose suffrages alone he seeks and values. How he would laugh at your romantic scruples, were you, in the simplicity of your heart, to confide them to him! Be assured, ma chère, that it is by no means necessary that love should be the prelude of matrimony. Au contraire, to those who intend, as sensible persons ought, to live in the world and do as others do, this selfish passion would be the greatest hinderance to comfort in a ménage conducted on the principles of those formed in fashionable life. Were you

“ in love," as this calamity is styled, with Lord Annandale, you would find the frequent absences imposed by business or pleasure on all men, a constant and irritating source of chagrin; and he would find your murmurs, or grave looks, on such occasions, any thing but agreeable. That he should admire you greatly is very desirable, because it will ensure your empire over him, without subjecting you to the ennuyeuses restrictions, and exigeances, which husbands who are in love with their wives impose. The more he admires you, the more will he be gratified by the admiration you excite in others : hence, you may count on more liberty, and consequently on more pleasure, than fall to the lot of those women who conjugate the verb to love with their husbands; a connubial process which, commencing with, I love, thou lovest, soon becomes enlivened by he loves, and, better still, they love; until all terminates in the past tense, we have loved. Before, however, this fatal stage of the conjugation arrives, how many unhappy hours, and lowering clouds, must the matrimonial horizon have known!

Yours will be exempt from all such; and your happiness will afford pleasure to no one more truly than to your

CAROLINE.

LADY A. VERNON TO MISS MONTRESSOR.

Delaward Park.

It is strange, dearest Caroline, but nevertheless true, that your worldly wisdom is much less congenial to my feelings, than are the

pure, and, as you call them, severe principles of Lady Delaward. There is something so heartless, so calculating, in your system, that I turn from it with dislike ; and your letter, which was forwarded to me here, has vexed and disappointed me. You should have seen the meeting of Lady Delaward and her father, and the affectionate and respectful attention Lord Delaward pays him, and then you would not, could not, depreciate the power of love; for, every courtesy to the parent indicated the warm attachment which the husband bore to the daughter. You should have seen, Caroline, the glances of deep, but silent tenderness, with which Lady Delaward repays her lord for each and all of these acts of attention ; and even you must have become sensible of the inestimable value

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of that sentiment which produces such effects. It is now that Lord Howard is repaid for all the chagrin he felt at his daughter's departure from his roof.

In witnessing the happiness of her well-ordered home, he ceases to remember that his has become lonely; and the deep, the devoted attachment of her husband, manifested in a thousand daily proofs, consoles him for having yielded her to him.

I like Lord Delaward more every hour. There is a kindness and cordiality in his manner towards those he considers his friends, that receives additional value from his stately courtesy to mere acquaintances. It may be only fancy, but I sometimes think that there is something of pity mingled in the

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