The Heroic Idiom of Shakespearean Tragedy

Przednia okładka
University of Delaware Press, 1985 - 254
0 Recenzje
Nie weryfikujemy opinii, ale staramy się wykrywać i usuwać fałszywe treści
Shakespeare's idiom is an aggregate of archaic modes of speech and codes of conduct. This book attempts to make that idiom more accessible and, in the process, to illuminate the significance of heroic concepts to a study of Shakespeare's tragedies and histories.

Z wnętrza książki

Co mówią ludzie - Napisz recenzję

Nie znaleziono żadnych recenzji w standardowych lokalizacjach.

Spis treści

Acknowledgments
9
Heroic Mimesis The Poor Itch of Your Opinion
15
Emulation Hath a Thousand Sons Heroism in the Early Plays
26
Ironic Heroism A Repudiation of the Past
48
The Matter of Troy
77
The Integrity of the Noble Moor
101
Timon and the Ethics of Heroism
120
Persistence of the Old Lear
141
Bellonas Bridegroom or Dwarfish Thief?
163
Antony Cleopatra and Heroic Retrospection
185
Notes
208
Bibliography
228
Index
238
Prawa autorskie

Inne wydania - Wyświetl wszystko

Kluczowe wyrazy i wyrażenia

Popularne fragmenty

Strona 181 - I conjure you, by that which you profess, (Howe'er you come to know it,) answer me : Though you untie the winds, and let them fight Against the churches ; though the yesty waves Confound and swallow navigation up; Though bladed corn be lodg'd, and trees blown down; Though castles topple on their warders...
Strona 64 - I am not yet of Percy's mind, the Hotspur of the north ; he that kills me some six or seven dozen of Scots at a breakfast, washes his hands, and says to his wife " Fie upon this quiet life ! I want work.
Strona 116 - It is the cause, it is the cause, my soul — Let me not name it to you, you chaste stars ! — It is the cause. Yet I'll not shed her blood; Nor scar that whiter skin of hers than snow, And smooth as monumental alabaster.
Strona 51 - To beg the voice and utterance of my tongue) A curse shall light upon the limbs of men; Domestic fury and fierce civil strife Shall cumber all the parts of Italy...
Strona 153 - Through tatter'd clothes small vices do appear ; Robes, and furr'd gowns, hide all. Plate sin with gold, And the strong lance of justice hurtless breaks : Arm it in rags, a pigmy's straw doth pierce it.
Strona 118 - No more of that : — I pray you, in your letters, When you shall these unlucky deeds relate, Speak of me as I am ; nothing extenuate, Nor set down aught in malice...
Strona 74 - Makes mouths at the invisible event, Exposing what is mortal and unsure To all that fortune, death and danger dare, Even for an egg-shell.
Strona 172 - I have given suck, and know How tender 'tis to love the babe that milks me : I would, while it was smiling in my face, Have pluck'd my nipple from his boneless gums, And dash'd the brains out, had I so sworn as you Have done to this.

Informacje bibliograficzne