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left an indelible impress on the soul which will go out with it to its eternal destiny. So live, then, that this may be the result of your labors. So live that your work, whether in the Church or in the world, may become a discipline for that glorious state of being in which the Church and the world shall become one, -where work shall be worship, and labor shall be rest,

where the worker shall never quit the temple, nor the worshiper the place of work, because there is no temple therein, but the Lord God Almighty and the Lamb are the temple thereof.'

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STORRS

THE PERMANENT MOTIVE IN

MISSIONARY WORK

RICHARD S. STORRS was born at Braintree, Mass., in 1821. In his book "Preaching Without Notes," he tells of his early practise and experience in pulpit delivery. After fifteen years patient effort he became one of the most accomplished extemporaneous speakers in America. He wrote much at first, developing a fine rhetorical style and a rich vocabulary that subsequently served him well as an impromptu speaker. His advice to divinity students was: “Always be careful to keep up the habit of writing, with whatever of skill, elegance, and force, you can command.” Because of this early training in writing he was able later in life to adopt the method of thoroughly preparing his thought for his sermons, and of leaving the choice of words and the framing of sentences to the moment of delivery. His greatest success was achieved after he became a purely extemporaneous preacher. He was for fifty-four years pastor of the Church of the Pilgrims, Brooklyn. During this time he produced a number of books, of which the most important is “ The Divine Origin of Christianity, Indicated by its Historical Effects." He died in 1900.

STORRS

1821-1900

THE PERMANENT MOTIVE IN

MISSIONARY WORK

Go ye into all the world and preach the gospel to every creature.—Mark xvi., 15.

T

HE Permanent Motive in Missionary

Work; it is a catholic and comprehen

sive, even a cosmopolitan theme. It does not concern itself simply with the interest of foreign missions, technically so called. But, if you think of it, it concerns those in every Christian communion who are trying to further the cause and kingdom of our Lord on the earth. It concerns not the missionary fields alone, as they are popularly called, in other lands, but every field in which Christian service is sought to be rendered, from the obscurest slum in this town of Boston to the ragged edges of the circumference, the outmost circumference, of the world of mankind.

We are familiar, of course, with the temporary, local, changing motives to missionary enterprise, which meet us at times, impress us forcibly for the moment, and pass away; the influence of great and signal occasions, when sympathies are almost tumultuously excited;

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