Report of the Annual Meeting, Tom 31

Przednia okładka
 

Co mówią ludzie - Napisz recenzję

Nie znaleziono żadnych recenzji w standardowych lokalizacjach.

Spis treści

Report on the Action of Prison Diet and Discipline on the Bodily
44
Freight as affected by Differences in the Dynamic Properties of Steam
82
Report on the Progress of Celestial Photography since the Aberdeen
94
Drs Williamson and Russell on an Apparatus for the rapid Separation
95
On the Theory of Exchanges and its recent extension By Balfour
97
On the Recent Progress and Present Condition of Manufacturing Che
108
On EthnoClimatology or the Acclimatization of Man By James
129
Rev T Hincks on the Development of the Uydroid Polyps Clavatella
145
On Experiments on the Gauging of Water by Triangular Notches
151
Report on Field Experiments and Laboratory Researches on the Con
158
Professor H Muller on the Existence and Arrangement of the Fovea Centra
171
Provisional Report on the Present State of our Knowledge respecting
173
Contributions to a Report on the Physical Aspect of the Moon
180
Preliminary Report of the Dredging Committee for the Mersey and
188
Preliminary Report on the Best Mode of Preventing the Ravages
200
Re W N Molrsworth on the Progress of Cooperation at Rochdale
225
On the Explosions in British CoalMines during the year 1859
236
Brief Summary of a Report on the Flora of the North of Ireland
240
On the Psychical and Physical Characters of the Mincopies or Natives
241
Report from the Balloon Committee By Colonel Sykes M P F R S
249
Mr R A Macpie on Patents considered Internationally
263
Interim Report of the Committee for Dredging on the North and East
280
Continuation of Report to determine the Effect of Vibratory Action
286
Report on the Theory of Numbers Part III By H J Stephen
292
MISCELLANEOUS COMMUNICATIONS TO THE SECTIONS
1
Mr W H L Russell on the Calculus of Functions with Remarks on
9
W Haidinoers attempt to account for the Physical Condition and
15
Rev Edward Hincks on the Quantity of the Acceleration of the Moons
22
Professor Y Thomsons Physical Considerations regarding the Possible
27
Mr William Thomas Shaws Method of interpreting some of the Pheno
33
Professor Hennessy on a Probable Cause of the Diurnal Variation of Magnetic
39
Mr Joun Mercer on Madder Photographs 87
87
Professor Tennant on a Specimen of Meteoric Iron from Mexico 93
93
Address by Sir Roderick I mpey Murchison President of the Section 95
95
Mr W H Bailys Palaeontological Remarks upon the Silurian Rocks of Ire
108
Professor Harkness on the Old Red Sandstone of South Perthshire 114
114
Mr George H Morton on the Pleistocene Deposits of the District around
120
Professor Phillipss Notice of the Postglacial Gravels of the Valley of
129
Messrs J T Wilkinson and J Whitaker on the Burnley Coalfield
135
Professor Dacbeny on the Functions discharged by the Roots of Plants
141
on the Ovicells of the Polyzoa with reference to the views
145
Rev Alfred Merle Norman on the Crustacea Echinodermata and Zoo
151
Dr P L Sclater8 Remarks on the late Increase of our Knowledge of
158
Professor Lionel S Beale on the Structure and Growth of the Elementary
164
Professor Remak on the Influence of the Sympathetic Nerve on Voluntary
171
Dr J Turnbull on the Physiological and Medicinal Properties of Sulphate
177
Mr R Alcocks Journey in the Interior of Japan with the Ascent of Fusi
183
Captain Camerons Notices on the Ethnology Geography and Commerce
189
Dr James Hector on the Capabilities for Settlement of the Central Parts
195
Captain W P Snow on the Geographical Science of Arctic Explorations
201
Rev W Caine on Ten Years Statistics of the Mortality amongst the Orphan
208
Dr W Clarke on a Revision of National Taxation 216
216
Mr J Heywood on the Inspection of Endowed Educational Institutions 222
222
Mr W Nrwmarch on the Extent to which Sonnd Principles of Taxation
230
Rev Canon Richson on the IncomeTax 240
240
Colonel Sykess Notes on the Progress and Prospects of the Trade of England
246
Sir W G Armstrong on the Patent Laws 252
252
Mr Peter Effertz on a Brickmaking Machine 258
258
Mr J Robinson on the Application of Workshop Tools to the Construction
264
Dr Mouatt on Prison Dietary in India 170
281
Mr B Stewart on the Photographic Records given at the Kew Observatory
282
Rev W Walton on some Signs of Changes of the Weather 74
288

Inne wydania - Wyświetl wszystko

Kluczowe wyrazy i wyrażenia

Popularne fragmenty

Strona xvii - To give a stronger impulse and a more systematic direction to scientific inquiry, — to promote the intercourse of those who cultivate Science in different parts of the British Empire, with one another and with foreign philosophers, — to obtain a more general attention to the objects of Science, and a removal of any disadvantages of a public kind which impede its progress.
Strona 27 - It is also impossible to conceive either the beginning or the continuance of life, without an overruling creative power ; and, therefore, no conclusions of dynamical science regarding the future condition of the earth can be held to give dispiriting views as to the destiny of the race of intelligent beings by which it is at present inhabited.
Strona xli - That the gentlemen whose names are appended be requested to act as a Committee (with power to add to their number) for the purpose of carrying out the previous resolution and of reporting to an adjourned public meeting to be held during the second week in October next.
Strona 133 - The German and Irish millions, like the Negro, have a great deal of guano in their destiny. They are ferried over the Atlantic and carted over America, to ditch and to drudge, to make corn cheap and then to lie down prematurely to make a spot of green grass on the prairie.
Strona 104 - I conclude further, that the dark lines of the solar spectrum which are not evoked by the atmosphere of the earth, exist in consequence of the presence, in the incandescent atmosphere of the sun, of those substances which in the spectrum of a flame produce bright lines at the same place.
Strona lxiii - When it is considered that stone bridges do not exceed 200 feet in span, nor cast-iron bridges 250 feet, we can estimate the progress which has been made in crossing rivers 400 or 500 feet in width, without any support at the middle of the stream. Even spans, greatly in excess of this, may be bridged over with safety, provided we do not exceed 1800 to 2000 feet, when the structure would be destroyed by its own weight.
Strona liii - Newton to introduce, at a later period, the idea of an attraction varying directly as the mass, and inversely as the square of the distance, and thus to reduce celestial phenomena to tho greatest simplicity, by comprehending them under a single law.
Strona lxv - Wray's compound and pure gutta-percha far surpass the commercial gutta-percha hitherto employed; but it remains to be seen whether the mechanical and commercial difficulties in the employment of these new materials can be successfully overcome. The external protecting covering is still a subject of anxious consideration. The objections to iron wire are its weight and liability to corrosion. Hemp has been substituted, but at present with no satisfactory result. All these difficulties, together with...
Strona 151 - This formula is submitted at present temporarily as being accurate enough for use for ordinary practical purposes for the measurement of water by notches similar to the one experimented on, and for quantities of water limited to nearly the same range as those in the experiments ; but...
Strona 103 - In the atmosphere around the sun, therefore, there must be present vapour of sodium, which, according to the mechanical explanation thus suggested, being particularly opaque for light of that quality prevents such of it as is emitted from the sun from penetrating to any considerable distance through the surrounding atmosphere.

Informacje bibliograficzne