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sides, and the connexion of the bark, cold, the flowers will have become erect that had been interrupted, is restored and fresh; then cut off the coddled end of again without any detriment to the tree the stems, and put them into cold water. or the branch operated upon, in wbich Moveable Axle.-Mr. ACKERMANN has the artificial wound soon again grows taken out a Patent for a most useful over. By this simple though artificial and ingenious invention, viz. a Movemeans of forcing every fruit-tree, with able Axle applicable to all Four-wheeled certainty, to bear, you obtain the fol- Carriages. Its advantages over the stiff lowing important advantages :. 1. You axle are numerous :“A carriage with the may compel every young tree of which Moveable Axle will turn in a much more you do not know the sort to show its limited space :-It permits a carriage to fruit, and decide sooner wbether, being be built shorter, and of course diminishes of a good quality, it may remain in its the draught. It affords complete secufirst state, or requires to be grafted. rity against upsetting, and is, in like 2. You may thereby, with certainty, get manner, a safeguard against accidents fruit of every good sort of which you in turning, the wheels never changing wish to see the produce in the next year. their position, but only their direction, 3. This method may probably serve to With the Moveable Axle the foreincrease considerably the quantity of wheels can be made much higher, while fruit in the country.-The branches so the body may, be hung lower. A high operated upon are hung full of fruit, . fore-wheel adds much to the beauty of while the others, that are not ringed, a carriage, while it also greatly reduces often have nothing, or very little, on the draught, and surmounts obstructions them. This effect is easy to be explained with much greater facility. It is by nó from the theory of the motion of the sap. means so liable to break as the stiff For, when the sap moves slowly in a axle; and the breaking of the perch. tree, it produces fruit-buds, which is bolt is rendered next to impossible. A the case in old trees; when it moves carriage with the Patent Moveable Axle vigorously, the tree forms wood, or runs requires but six pieces of timber, includinto shoots, as happens with young trees. ing the pole, instead of twenty. This Though I arrived at this discovery myself gives the carriage an airy appearance, in consequence of trying the same pro- and reduces the rattling noise. cess with a different view, namely, to in: Lithography.-The art of Lithography crease only the size of the fruit, but not continues to make most rapid progress to force barren branches, that were only in France, from the rival exertions of furnished with leaf-buds, to bear, this Count LASTEYRIE and M. ENGLEMANN ; latter application being before quite un- their spirited emulation has done for it known to me; I will, on that account, what a monopoly would not have accomby no means give myself out for the first plished in a century. Under Count Lasinventor of this operation ; but I was teyrie's care, it rivals copper in almost ignorant of the effects to be produced every line of engraving; and possesses, by this method, and only discovered besides, advantages peculiar to itself. them by repeated experiments of my A series of Lithographic prints,' by Count own, which I made for the promotion of Lasteyrie, is now publishing at Paris; Pomology. Frequent experience of the the second number of which, containing completest success has confirmed the six plates, has just appeared; the sixth truth of my observations. Nor do I think plate is written music, or, as the Lithothat this method is generally known; at graphers denote it, autographed music. least, to all those to whom I showed the The method by which this plate is exeexperiment, the effect produced appeared cuted displays one of the most important new and surprising."

advantages of Lithography: a person Effect of Hot Water on Flowers.-By writes a letter, composes music, or the following process the lovers of flowers makes a drawing on paper in the ordiwill be enabled to prolong, for a nary way, excepting that he uses a peday, the enjoyment of their short-lived culiar ink; this is transferred to the beauty. Most flowers begin to droop and stone by simply passing it through the fade after being kept during 24 hours in press, and the stone, without further water : a few may be revived by substi- preparation, is ready to print off thoututing fresh water; but all (the most sands of proofs, all equally perfect. fugacious, such as the poppy, and per- It is this quality of Lithography that haps one or two others, excepted) may has secured its admission into all the be completely restored by the use of hot French public offices; by its means water. For this purpose, place the flowers 60,000 or 70,000 proclamations, in the in scalding water, deep enough to cover autograph of the Minister, may be about one third of the length of the taken off and dispatched before the stem; by the time the water has become plate even could be engraved.

SELECT

SELECT POETRY.

chose ;

Mr. URBAN,

Dublin, Feb. 7. Mr. URBAN, Northamptonshire. The following Lines were written by a I AM but a mental wanderer over the

young Lady of sixteen, after having interesting Field of Waierloo ; and in been present at a conversation, the suba one of ihose excursions to which we have ject of which was the great, and philan- often been invited by the prolusions of the thropic charities of Mr. Thomas PLEASANTS actual Tourist, the following. Inscription (see p. 113). Your giving them an early to the memory of its fallen Heroes was insertion will oblige many of your Readers. composed.

R. E. TO bless mankind, alleviate their woes,

ODE, Kind Heaven one bright excelling spirit

Written in the year 1817.

By the Rev. R. EXTON. Enwrapt that spirit in a mortal frame,

SWEET, when the strife of time is past, To shine on earth, yet shine avoiding fame ;

The weary Pilgrim's rest;

When o'er bis form the fresh sod cast Bade the kind gift on Erin's shores de. scend,

[friend.

Les lightly on his breast : And named it Pleasants, human nature's

No orplan ibere may urge his cry, He feels the power divine which plac'd

No childless parent strain the eye, him there,

[care.

No country pour its mingled sigh ; And makes his fellow-inen bis constant

Yet ballow'd is his grave.
What though we raise the monumental Far.sweeter.-- when the glorious toil
stone,

Tvat nerv'd the Warrior's might,
To Heroes dead, for deeds of valour done! With crested Victory's cheering smile
What though we celebrate th' inspired Hath bless'd his eager sight;
Bard,

And Fare's aspiring * shaft hath sped,
And deem his honours a deserv'd reward ! And weeping comrades o'er his bed
Oh can such honours, PLEASANTS, e'er excel (High Valour's meed!) beirtribute shed
Those thou receivest, and deserv'st so The slumbers of the brave !
well ?

Around the turf where these repose Can sculptur'd marble such bright joy im

Shall sweets perennial bloom ; part

Their earliest, latest charm disclose, As the sweet blessings of a grateful heart? To deck each verdant tomb : Çan public plaudits such delights bestow, Here shall stern Honour bend to weep, As praises breath'd by one releas'd from Affection here her vigils keep,

And grateful Freedoin guard their sleep Yet he has rais'd his own * Memorial here,

From fell Ainbition's rage :
Şacred to Mercy, and to Pity dear ;
For Pity's self had stood delighted hy,

Here meek-eyed Peace shall love to dwell, And view'd its rising walls with humid eye;

Avd bless the hoary swain

Who points the spot where Heroes fell, And as she gaz'd, had fondly, proudly

Tu fix her gentle reign : own'd,

Anu Poësy sball weave for them Her counter-part in PLEASANTS she had

Her amaranthine diadem, found, No longer now resounds the anguish'd moan,

While History yields her brightest gem

To grace their deathless page !
Nor struggling Virtue dies forgoi, alone.
Now honest Labour lifts his drooping head,

CREATION.
No longer forc'd to beg for daily bread.
Nor starving Industry in rags is seen ;

(Concluderl from p. 66.) But joys with grateful heart, and alterd WAY veilest thou, with blindness of mien;

thy words, And feels the wealth bestow'd by gracious Thy earthly wisdom? Where wast thoy, O Heaven,

Man, To aid the human race was kindly given

Whey World's foundation, strength conTo him, who seeks with eager eye the poor,

firm'd, I plac'd ? And scatters blessiugs from his liberal And Ocean with a zone of deep: I bound? store ;

And with attractive sympathy of 000 And now, and ever, shall he sweetly prove, Struck the returning Tides ? Althy comThe blest rewards of patriotic love!

mand, P. M. O Man, their starry power do Pleiads shed?

Know'st thou the womb of Winter, preg. * The Stove Tenter House, erected at

nant source the sole expence of Mr. PLEASANTS.

* Death loves a shining mark.--YOUNG.

Of Gent. Mag. February, 1818.

woe?

After a few words from the Lord Advo- repeal. There were still persons at work, cate of Scotland, Lord A. Hamilton, and from in the Metropolis, and elsewhere, endeaMessrs. Bennet and Brougham, the Address vouring to excite disaffection; but there was carried unanimously.

was nothing in their attempts that could

not be put down by the vigour of the Law, HOUSB Up Lords, Jan. 28., the vigilance of the Government, and the Viscount Sidmouth presented a Bill for loyalty and activity of the Magistracy. repealing the Habeas Corpus Suspension The Noble Lord had alluded to the proseAct, which was read the first time. His cutions of Mr. Hone. With regard to Lordship then moved to suspend tbe stand. these, he rejected with indigoation all im. ing orders (forbiilding the passing a Bill putation of base motives (for hypocrisy he through more than one stage in the same considered to be a base motive); and placed day) with reference to this Bill. Ordered. the prosecutions upon the general feelOn the second reading of the Bill, the pre, ings against Parodies of that description. amble was read, which, after reciting the The Bill was then read a second time, titles of the two Acts, one suspending the the Commitment negatived, and the Bill Habeas Corpus till the 1st of July last, ordered to be engrossed. The engrossed and the other continuiug the suspension Bill was brought into the House almost till the 1st of March next, stated that the immediately. was then read the third continuance of the powers thus granted time, and passed ; and ordered to be sent was no longer necessary.

to the Commons. Lord Holland said, that neither in the Trials that had taken place in the Metro

In the Commons, the same day, Lord polis, at Derby, or in Scotland, had any

Castlereugh, after an introductory speech, necessity been proved to exist for the sus

moved Addresses of condoleace to the pension of the Act. There was no prco,

Queen and to Prince Leopold, on the loss in any of the cases that had occurred, of which the Royal Family and the Country any insurrection, that did not appear to

had sustained in the death of the late Prin, have been fomented by the agents or the cess Charlotte of Wales. spies of Government. After alluding to the trials of Mr. Hone for blasphemous

On the question being put for an Address

to the Queen, Mr. Calcraft said, he should, Parodies, and giving it as bis Lordship’s though with pain, give his negative to the opinion that, had those Parodies been di

motion, and should at the same time best rected against the Opposition or Reformers, discharge bis duty by not assigoing reano prosecution would have been instituted;

sons for his conduct. the Noble Lord concluded with declaring,

Mr. M. A. Taylor also expressed a simi. that he felt it to be his duty to deliver his

lar determination, and was followed by opinion in condemnation of the measures

other Gentlemen. No numerical division which had been resorted to, without any

took place on the subject; but it is readequate reason, and upon asserted infor.

markable that Mr. Speaker, when the cries mation, which he was satisfied could not stand the test of real inquiry.

of Aye and No had been repeated from all Viscount Sidmouth declared, that he was

parts of the House, adopted that form of unconscious of any harsh or cruel exer

words which is expressive of doubi, and

usually leads to a division; " and the cise of the powers entrusted to Ministers

Ayes, I think,” said be (casting a glauce under this Act. The responsibility of its execution rested, of course, chiefly with

over the House, and speaking hesitatiogly)

" the Ayes, I think, have it." himself; and he could say that he had

The motion was then declared to be caranxiously endeavoured to do his duty- ried in the affirmative; and Mr. Disbrowe that he had acted, to the best of his judgmeut, leniently, but firmly--that he had in

was appointed to carry it to the Queen. view only to prevent the threatened danger, and had not been the means of depriving

Jan. 29. individuals of liberty any further than as

A Bill to repeal the Act for the Suspen. the necessity of the case required. The sion of the Habea: Corpus was brought from improvement in the condition of ihe lower the other House, and read the first time. classes, he was happy to say, rendered On the second reading, some conversathe further continuance of the Act unne

tion took place. Lord Folkestone said, cessary; and although there was no prece- that, as far as he could form a judgment, dent upon the Records of Parliament for the persons confined on mere suspicion, repealing an Act of this description, all of and discharged recently on recognizances, them having been suffered to expire, yet had been unjustiy treated. He could uot he was of opinion that, the necessity having see the right so to bind them by recognizceased, the Act ought not to be allowed to continue any longer; and therefore, al- That right was strenuously maintained though the period till jis expiration was by the ttorney and Solicitor-Generais, very short, he had deterininod to move its Lord Castlereagh, and Mr. B. Bathurst.

ances.

HISTORICAL CHRONICLE.

PROCEEDINGS IN PARLIAMENT.
House of Lords, Jan. 27,

refrain from alluding to the late three sucThe customary Address to the Prince cessive trials. 'Mr. Hone's able defence Regent was moved by the Earl of Aylesford, of himself convinced him, as it had conand was seconded by the Lord Selsey. vinced tlıree Juries, that he had been Both of these Noblemen, after dilating on guilty of no legal offence. But why was the general grief evinced by the Nation on the prosecution continued after a Jury had the loss of the Princess Charlotte, congra- pronounced a verdict of acquittal ? tulated the House on the information that (Hear, hear!)-A Jury was the only comthe prospects of the Country were bright- petent tribunal to say what was or was not a ening : our commerce, foreigo and do- Libel. The Judge had given bis own opinion, mestic, was rapidly improving; our reve- in opposition to the Jury, the only compe. due was increasing ; and public credit tent authority.-(Hear, hear.) --The opi.. stood again on the most satisfactory and nion of the Judge was not desired at all on unshaken basis.

such a question. The evil of prosecutions Earl Stanhope would condemn a factious of this sort was great indeed; but it was opposition to those Ministers who had not to be compared with the evil of desteered the vessel of state in safety through stroying the confidence of the Country in a storm unparalleled in difficulty and dan- the Trial by Jury.- (Hear, hear, hear.) ger. Under the present Administration The Attorney General said, that all three the principles of anarchy and insubordi. Parodies were Libels upon sacred subjects nation, so dangerous to society, had been of the Church-service. The object of the more effectually opposed than ever. Ad- prosecution was not punishment, but the verting to the military occupation of prevention of the circulation of the writings France, his Lordship stigmatised the French prosecuted. It was his deliberale opinion, as " the most unprincipled people on the that he was bound to proceed, unless be globe-a

- a people who had pursued the ca- were convinced, by the verdict of Not reer of slaves and robbers, and were now guilty in the one trial, that the defeudanı the most abject of the human race.” He was not guilty of the other two Libels. knew from conversation with the Duke of Sir Samuel Romilly condemned the susOtranto, better known by the name of pension of the Habeas Corpus; and conFouche, that it was his opinion, the instant tended, from the proceedings on the trials Buonaparte was set loose, the Bourbons at Derby, and from the release of many of would cease to reign, and the fall of that the Manchester prisoners as far back as family would ensure a war against the rest September, that ihe conspiracies so much of Europe ; and the renewal of such a talked of by Ministers had no existence, contest as that we had lately been engaged prior to the passing of the Suspension Bill; in must be attended with inevitable de. but were first batched about the beginning struction to this country.

of June, at the instigation of Government The Marquis of Lansdowne would not emissaries. The prosecution against Hone propose any amendment, though he could was a part of that system on which Minis. concur with only that part of the Address ters came into and remained in office, which related to the death of the Princess But the religious cry had not, on this occaCharlotte. He insisted that no evidence sion, turned to their advantage. He strongof any thing like an organized conspiracy ly censured the Parodies; but observed had been discovered, which called for the that the Attorney-General had absurdly suspension of the Constitution.

begun only to prosecute for them months The Earl of Liverpool shortly replied; after they had been voluntarily suppressed, when the Address was agreed to.

and by his repeated prosecutions had con

trived to produce a convenient little voIn the Commons, the same day, the Jume of such compositions to be handed Speech from the Throne being then taken down to posterity. into consideration, the customary Addiess The Solicitor General contended for the was proposed by Mr. Wodehouse, and accuracy of the statements on which Parseconded by Mr. Windham Quin.

liament had suspended the Habeas Corpus Lord Althorpe agreed with every part of Act; and vindicated the proceedwgs with the Address, excepting that which ascribed regard to Hone. the present tranquillity of the Country to Lord Castlereagh said, that Papers would the measures of Government; yet on that on Mouday be laid before the House, which subject he should not now enter. Delicale would fully justify the measures adopted as was the topick, he could not, however, by the Administration,

After

After a few words from the Lord Advo- repeal. There were still persons at work, cate of Scotland, Lord A. Hamilton, and from in the Metropolis, and elsewhere, endeaMessrs. Bennet and Brougham, the Address vouring to excite disaffection; but there was carried unanimously.

was nothing in their attempts that could

not be put down by the vigour of the Law, House of Lords, Jan. 28.', the vigilance of the Goverament, and the Viscount Sidmouth presented a Bill for loyalty and activity of the Magistracy. repealing the Habeas Corpus Suspension The Noble Lord had alluded to the proseAct, which was read the first time. His cutions of Mr. Hone. With regard to Lordship then moved to suspend the stand- these, he rejected with indignation all im. ing orders (forbiilding the passing a Bill putation of base motives (for hypocrisy he through more than one stage in the same considered to be a base motive); and placed day) with reference to this Bill. Ordered. the prosecutions upon the general feelOn the second reading of the Bill, the pre. ings against Parodies of that description. amble was read, which, after reciting the The Bill was then read a second time, titles of the two Acts, one suspending the the Commitment negatived, and the Bill Habeas Corpus till the 1st of July last, ordered to be engrossed. The engrossed and the other continuiug the suspension Bill was brought into the House almost till the 1st of March next, stated that the immediately. It was then read the third continuance of the powers thus grauted time, and passed ; and ordered to be sent was no longer necessary.

to the Commons. Lord Holland said, that neither in the Trials that had taken place in the Metro

In the Commons, the same day, Lord polis, at Derby, or in Scotland, had any

Castlereugh, after an introductory speech, necessity been proved to exist for the sus

moved Addresses of condolence to the pension of the Act. There was no prco,

Queen and to Prince Leopold, on the loss in any of the cases that had occurred, of which the Royal Family and the Country any insurrection, that did not appear to had sustained in the death of the late Prin, have been fomented by the agents or the

cess Charlotte of Wales. spies of Government. After alluding to

On the question being put for an Address the trials of Mr. Hone for blasphemous

to the Queen, Mr. Calcraft said, he should, Parodies, and giving it as bis Lordship’s though with pain, give his negative to the opinion that, had those Parodies been di

motion, and should at the same time best rected against the Opposition or Reformers, discharge bis duty by not assigning reano prosecution would have been justituted;

sons for his conduct. the Noble Lord concluded with declaring,

Mr. M. A. Taylor also expressed a simi, that he felt it to be bis duty to deliver his

lar determination, and was followed by opinion in condemnation of the measures

other Gentlemen. No numerical division which had been resorted to, without any

took place on the subject; but it is readequate reason, and upon asserted infor.

markable that Mr. Speaker, when the cries mation, which he was satisfied could not stand the test of real inquiry.

of Aye and No had been repeated from all Viscount Sidmouth declared, that he was

parts of the House, adopted that form of unconscious of any harsh or cruel exer

words which is expressive of doubi, and

usually leads to a division ; " and the cise of the powers entrusted to Ministers

Ayes, I think,” said he (casting a glauce under this Act. The responsibility of its execution rested, of course, chiefly with

over the House, and speaking besitatiogly)

" the Ayes, I think, have it." himself; and he could say that he had

The moiion was then declared to be caranxiously endeavoured to do his duty

ried in the affirmative ; and Mr. Disbrowe that he had acted, 10 the bent of his judg

was appointed to carry it to the Queen. ment, leniently, but firmly--that he had in view only to prevent the threatened danger, and had not been the means of depriving

Jan. 29. individuals of liberty any further than as A Bill to repeal the Act for the Suspen. the necessity of the case required. The sion of the Habeas Corpus was brought from improvement in the condition of ihe lower the other House, and read the first time. classes, he was happy to say, rendered On the second reading, some conversathe further continuance of the Act unne- tion took place. Lord Folkestone said, cessary; and although there was no prece- that, as far as he could form a judgment, dent upon the Records of Parliament for the persons confined on mere suspicion, repealing an Act of this description, all of and discharged recently on recogoizances, them having been suffered to expire, yet had been unjustiy treated. He could uot he was of opinion that, the necessity having see the right so to bind them by recognizceased, the Act ought not to be allowed to continue any longer ; and therefore, al- That right was strenuously maintained though the period till jis expiration was by the ditorney and Solicitor-Generals, very short, he had determined to move its Lord Castleieagh, and Mr. B. Bathurst.

The

ances.

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