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ted to the memory of Nelson, (which at with a view to architectural decorapresent encumbers the most prominent tion, have in general tended only to part of the hill,) to be swept away, and disfigure and degrade the finest situaihis design erected in its place. This tions. The erection of the Parthenon, could be objected to by none, provi- according to Mr Reid's proposal, ded a nobler monument were imme. would do more to supply deficiencies, diately erected to our great Admiral, than the turrets and pinnacles, and all and would be highly gratifying to all the other frippery of a thousand Gopersons of taste ; while those who thic chapels. stickle for the authority of the an Having no personal feelings to gra. cients, would not only have the de- tify, but deeply impressed with the tails after the most approved standards, conviction of the dignity and importbut an entire edifice, according to the ance of this, as well as the other model of the most perfect specimen of branches of the Fine Arts, we have stathe finest era of ancient art.

ted, with freedom and impartiality, our It has always been regretted, that sentiments on this subject, a duty Edinburgh, standing on so singular which we consider the more necessary, and picturesque a situation, in the on account of the many injuries which midst of so much beautiful and roman- have already been committed against tic scenery, has received so little assist- good taste in the public edifices of this ance from the hand of art, and that magnificent city, the structures which have been erected

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1816.

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[Tue original of these verses occurs in a collection of German popular songs, en

titled Sammlung Deutschen Volkslieder, Berlin, 1807, published by. Messrs Busching and Von der Hagen, both, and more especially the last, distinguished for their acquaintance with the ancient popular poetry anel legendary history of Germany. In the German Editor's notice of the ballad, it is stated to have been extracted from a ma

nuscript Chronicle of Nicolaus Thomann, chaplain to Saint Leonard in Weisenhorn, which bears the date 1533; and the song is stated by the author to have been generally sung in the neighbourhood at that early period. Thomann, as quoted by the German Editor, seems faithfully to have believe-l the event he narrates. He quotes tomb-stones and obituaries to prove the existence of the personages of the ballad, and discovers that there actually died on the 11th May 1349, a Lady Von Neuffen, Countess of Marstetten, who was by birth of the house of Moringer. This Lady he supposes to have been Moringer's daughter mentioned in the ballad. He quotes the same authority for the death of Berckhold Von Neuffen in the same year. The editors, on the whole, seem to embrace the opinion of Professor Smith of Ulm, who, from the language of the ballad, ascribes its date to the fifteenth century. The legend itself turns on an incident not peculiar to Germany, and which perhaps

was not unlikely to happen in more instances than one, when crusaders abode long in the Holy Land, and their disconsolate dames received no tidings of their fate. A story very similar in circumstances, but without the miraculous machinery of Saint Thomas, is told of one of the ancient Lords of Haigh-hall in Lancashire, the patrimonial inheritance of the late Countess of Balcarras; and the particulars are represented on stained glass upon a window in that ancient manor house.]

1.

O, will you hear a knightly tale of old Bohemian day,
It was the noble Moringer in wedlock bed he lay,
He halsed and kiss'd his dearest dame, that was as sweet as May,
And said, “ Now, Lady of my heart, attend the words I say.

2. “ 'Tis I have vow'd a pilgrimage unto a distant shrine, And I must seek Saint Thomas-land, and leave the land that's mine ; Here shalt thou dwell the while in state, so thou wilt pledge thy fay, That thou for my return wilt wait seven twelvemonths and a day.”

3. Then out and spoke that Lady bright, sore troubled in her cheer, “ Now tell me true, thou noble knight, what order takest thou here; And who shall lead thy vassal band, and bold thy lordly sway, And be thy Lady's guardian true when thou art far away?"

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4.
Out spoke the noble Moringer, “ Of that have thou no care,
There's many a valiant gentleman of me holds living fair;
The trustiest shall rule my land, my vassals and my state,
And be a guardian tried and true to thee, my lovely matc.

5. “ As Christian-man, I needs must keep the vow which I have plight, When I am far in foreign land, remember thy true knight; And ceasc, my dearest dame, to grieve, for vain were sorrow now, But grant thy Moringer his leave, since God hath heard his vow,"

6.
It was the noble Moringer from bed he made him bowne,
And met him there his Chamberlain, with ewer and with gown;
He flung the mantle on his back, 'twas furr’d with miniver,
He dipp'd his hand in water cold, and bathed his forehead fair.

7. “ Now hear," he said, “ Sir Chamberlain, true vasgal art thou mine, And such the trust that I repose in that proved worth of thine; For seven years shalt thou rule my towers, and lead my vassal train, And pledge thee for my Lady's faith till I return again,"

8. The Chamberlain was blunt and true, and sturdily said he, “ Abide, my Lord, and rule your own, and take ibis redle from me; That woman's faith's a brittle trust-Seven twelvemonths did'st thou say? I'll pledge me for no Lady's truih beyond the seventh fair day.”

9.
The noble Baron turn’d him round, his heart was full of care,
His gallant Esquire stood him nigh, he was Marstetten's heir,
To whom he spoke right anxiously, “ Thou trusty squire to me,
Wilt thou receive this weighty trust when I am o'er the sea ?

10. “ To watch and ward my castle strong, and to protect ny land, And to the hunting or the host to lead my vassal band; And pledge thee for my Lady's faith, till seven long years are gone, And guard her as Our Lady dear was guarded by Saint John,"

11. Marstetten's heir was kind and true, but fiery, hot and young, And readily he answer made with too presumptuous tongue ; “ My noble Lord, cast care away, and on your journey wend, And trust this charge to me until your pilgrimage have end.

12. “ Rely upon my plighted faith, which shall be truly tried, To guard your lands, and ward your towers, and with your vassals ride ; And for your lovely Lady's faith, so virtuous and so dear, I'll gage my head it knows no change, be absent thirty year.”

13.
The noble Moringer took cheer when thus he heard him speak,
And doubt forsook his troubled brow, and sorrow left his cheek ;
A long adieu he bids to all-hoists top-sails, and away,
And wanders in Saint Thomas-land seven twelvemonths and a day.

14,
It was the noble Moringer within an orchard slept,
When on the Baron's slumbering sense a boding vision crept,
And whisper'd in his ear a voice, “ 'Tis time, Sir Knight, to wake,
Thy Lady and thine heritage another master take.

15. “ Thy tower another banner knows, thy steeds another rein, And stoop them to another's will thy gallant vassal train ; And she, the Lady of thy love, so faithful once and fair, This night within thy father's hall she weds Marstetten's heir."

16. It is the noble Moringer starts up and tears his beard, “ Oh would that I had ne'er been born! what tidings have I heard? To lose my lordship and my lands the less would be my care, But God, that ere a squire untrue should wed my Lady fair !

17. “O good Saint Thomas hear," he pray'd, “my patron Saint art thou, A traitor robs me of my land even wbile I pay my vow! My wife he briogs to infamy, that was so pure of name, And I am far in foreign land, and must endure the shame!"

18. It was the good Saint Thomas, then, who heard his pilgrim's prayer And sent a sleep so deep and dead that it o'erpower'd his care ; He waked in fair Bohemian land outstretch'd beside a rill, High on the right a castle stood, low on the left a mill. VOL. IX. PART II.

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