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an acid or alkaline reaction, * which is part, and the maceration obviously of a a confirmation of my experiments. purely mechanical nature. A similar

The Actiniæ do not effect their pre- appearance is presented by meat, after paration of nutriment by chemical its ejection by the Actinia : it is pulpy, means; and in our strict sense of the colourless, but the muscles are not disterm, they cannot be said to digest. integrated. I was anxious to see how far mechani- I dare not pause now to touch upon cal means were employed, and for the many topics which are suggested this, Reaumur's admirable experiment by the conclusions to which these inwas a guide. In his day it was sup- vestigations led me. It will be enough posed that digestion was a purely just to note here the progressive commechanical operation, the food being plication of the digestive function in ground into à pulp in the stomach. The progressive complexity of the He took hollow silver balls, perforated animal series. Starting from the with holes, and filling them with meat, simple cell which draws its nutricaused them to be swallowed by a ment from the plasma surrounding dog. When they had remained & it, by a simple process of endosmosis, suitable period in the animal's sto- we first arrive at the mouthless mach, they were withdrawn by the Actinophrys, or Amaba, which, foldthread attached to them. If the di- ing its own substance over the food, gestive process were mechanical, the presses out such nutriment as it can; meat would be protected from all we then reach the Infusory with a grinding action, by the silver cover- mouth, but without stomach of any ing; if chemical, the meat would be kind;and the Polype, wbich has a digested ; and digested (or rather portion of its integument folded in, chymified) it proved to be ; showing serving both for mouth and stomach, that a solvent fluid had penetrated but not anatomically differing from the holes and dissolved the meat. I the external integument, nor physiotook a piece of quill, of about half-an logically differing in its action from inch in length, open at both ends, that of the Amaba's gelatinous suband having six good openings cut in stance ;t we then ascend to the Annethe sides, thus affording ample means lids having a real intestine, lying free for any solvent fluid to exert its ac- in the general cavity, but only mode tion on the roast beef enclosed in the rately, when at all, farnished with quill. On examination of the ejected secretory apparatus ; and so on till quills, I found no appreciable differ- at length we reach the Mammalia, ence between the contained meat, and with their marvellously complex disimilar pieces of meat left in the water gestive apparatus. Corresponding during the same period ; in one of with this increasing complexity of the them which had the meat protruding organs is the increasing complexity of somewhat from each end of the quill, the food which the animals digest, from there was a maceration of the pro- simple gases up to meat. truded ends, which looked like a di- If all were not so marvellous in gestive effect, but on submitting it to Nature, would not the marvellous the microscope, I found the muscle- fact that food at all exists, arrest us? fibres not at all disintegrated, the Food is what the organism can sepagtriæ being as perfect as in any other rate from the world around it, con

* "Il est remarquable, et je m'en suis souvent assuré, que les papiers réactifs plongés dans cet organe, et dans la cavité inférieure, soit au moment de la digestion, soit chez l'animal à jeûn, ne donnent aucun indice d'acidité ni d'alcalanité."-"Etudes Zoologiques sur le genre Actinia."-Revue et Magazin de Zoologie, No. 4. 1854.

+ Nobody now believes in Ehrenberg's Polygastrica, or many-stomached animaloules.

# Trembley turned a Hydra inside out, and found the outside perform the function of a stomach. This has been held as proof that a mucus membrane is only a reflection of the skin. But from what has been advanced in this paper the reader may suspect that, inasmuch as the polype has no mucus membrane whatever, the socalled stomach not being anatomically distinguishable from the external skin, and the process of digestion being wholly mechanical, the current opinion is not proved by Trembley's experiment.

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verting what it separates into its own individual activity,—the yearning of life. May we not consider Life itself the creature to be united with the

an ever-increasing identification Creator? with Nature? The simple cell, from As with life, so also with knowwhich the plant or animal arises, ledge, which is intellectual life. In must draw light and heat from the the early days of man's history, Nasun, nutriment from the surrounding ture and her marvellous ongoings world, or else it will remain quiescent, were regarded with but a casual and not alive, although latent with life, as careless eye, or else with the merest the grains in Egyptian tombs, which, wonder. It was late before profound after lying thousands of years quies- and reverent study of her laws could cent in those sepulchres, are placed wean men from impatient speculain the earth, and then smile forth as tions ; and now, what is our intelleegolden wheat. What we call growth, tual activity based on, except on the is it not a perpetual absorption of Na- more thorough mental absorption of ture, the identification of the indi. Nature ? When that absorption is vidual with the universal? And may completed, the mystic drama will be we not in speculative moods consider sunny clear, and all Nature's proDeath as the grand impatience of the cesses will be visible to man, as a soul to free itself from the circle of divine effluence and life.

SCENES OF CLERICAL LIFE.-NO. II.

MR. GILFIL'S LOVE-STORY.

PART IV, -CHAPTER XIV.

“ Yes, Maynard,” said Sir Chris- distended with terror, rushed in, topher, chatting with Mr. Gilfil in threw her arms round Sir Christothe library,“ it really is a remarkable pher's neck, and gasping out—"An. thing that I never in my life laid a thony . the Rookery dead plan, and failed to carry it out. I in the Rookery,” fell fainting on lay my plans well, and I never swerve the floor. from them—that's it. A strong will In a moment Sir Christopher was is the only magic. And next to out of the room, and Mr. Gilfil was striking out one's plans the plea- bending to raise Caterina in his arms. santest thing in the world is to see As he lifted her from the ground he them well accomplished. This year, felt something hard and heavy in her now, will be the happiest of my life, pocket. What could it be? The all but the year '53, when I came weight of it would be enough to hurt into possession of the Manor, and her as she lay. He carried her to married Henrietta. The last touch the sofa, put his hand in her pocket, is given to the old house ; Anthony's and drew forth the dagger. marriage—the thing I had nearest Maynard shuddered. Did she my heart — is settled to my entire mean to kill herself, then, or satisfaction; and by-and-by you ... a horrible suspicion forced itself will be buying a little wedding-ring upon him. “ Dead in the Rookery." for Tina's finger. Don't shake your He hated himself for the thought head in that forlorn way ;—when I that prompted him to draw the dagmake prophecies, they generally come ger from its sheath. No! there was to pass. But there's a quarter after no trace of blood, and he was ready twelve striking I must be riding to kiss the good steel for its innoto the High Ash to meet Markham cence. He thrust the weapon into about felling some timber. My old his own pocket; he would restore it oaks will have to groan for this as soon as possible to its well-known wedding, but”

place in the gallery. Yet why had The door burst open, and Cate. Caterina taken this dagger ? What rina, ghastly and panting, her eyes was it that had happened in the

... or

some

Rookery? Was it only a delirious the mound and have begun to devision of hers ?

scend. Sir Christopher sees some. He was afraid to ring—afraid to thing purple down on the path below summon any one to Caterina's assis- among the yellow leaves. "Ropert is tance. What might she not say already beside it, but Sir Christopher when she awoke from this fainting cannot move faster. A tremor has fit? She might be raving. He could taken hold of the firm limbs. Rupert not leave her, and yet he felt as if he comes back and licks the trembling were guilty for not following Sir band, as if to say Courage!" and Christopher to see what was the then is_down again spufing the truth. It took but a moment to think body. Yes, it is a body ... Anand feel all this, but that moment thony's body. There is the white seemed such a long agony to him, hand with its diamond ring clutching that he began to reproach himself the dark leaves. His eyes are half for letting it pass without seeking open, but do not heed the gleam

means of reviving Caterina. sunlight that darts itself directly on Happily the decanter of water on Sir them from between the boughs. Christopher's table was untouched. Still he might only have fainted ; He would at least try the effect of it might only be a fit. Sir Christhrowing that water over her. She topher knelt down, unfastened the might revive without his needing to cravat, unfastened the waistcoat, call any one else.

and laid his hand on the beart. It Meanwhile Sir Christopher was might be syncope ; it might not-it hurrying at his utmost speed towards could not be death. No! that the Rookery; his face, so lately bright thought must be kept far off. and confident, now agitated by a “Go, Bates, get help ; we'll carry vague dread.

The deep alarmed him to your cottage. Send some one bark of Rupert, who ran by his side, to the house to tell Mr. Gilfil and had struck the ear of Mr. Bates, then Warren. Bid them send off for on his way homeward, as something Doctor Hart, and break it to my unwonted, and, hastening in the lady and Miss Assher that Anthony direction of the sound, he met the is ill." baronet just as he was approaching

Mr. Bates hastened away, and the the entrance of the Rookery. Stř baronet was left alone kneeling beChristopher's look was enough. Mr. side the body. The young and Bates said nothing, but hurried along supple limbs, the rounded cheeks, by his side, while Rupert dashed for the delicate ripe lips, the smooth ward among the dead leaves with white hands, were lying cold and his nose to the ground. They had rigid ; and the aged face was bendscarcely lost sight of him a minute, ing over them in silent anguish; when a change in the tone of his the aged deep-veined hands were bark told them that he had found seeking with tremulous inquiring something, and in another instant he touches for some symptom that life was leaping back over one of the was not irrevocably gone. large planted mounds. They turned Rupert was there too, waiting and aside to ascend the mound, Rupert watching; licking first the dead and leading them; the tumultuous caw- then the living hands ; then running ing of the rooks, the very rostling off on Mr. Bates's track as if he would of the leaves, as their feet plunged follow and hasten his return, but in among them, falling like an evil omen a moment turning back again, anon the baronet's ear.

able to quit the scene of his master's They have reached the summit of sorrow.

OHAPTER XV.

It is a wonderful moment, the first over the blank features, like the ris time we

stand by one who has ing sunlight on the alpine summits fainted, and witness the fresh birth that lay ghastly and dead under the of consciousness spreading itself leaden twilight. A slight shudder,

and the frost-bound eyes recover their fresh air, and with every increase of liquid light; for an instant they strength came increased vividness show the inward semi-consciousness of emotion, increased yearning to be of an infant's; then, with a little where her thought was in the Rookstart, they open wider and begin to ery with Anthony. She walked look; the present is visible, but only more and more swiftly, and at last, as a strange writing, and the inter- gathering the artificial strength of paspreter Memory is not yet there. sionate excitement, began to run.

Mr. Gilfil felt a trembling joy as But soon she hears the tread of this change passed over Caterina's heavy steps, and under the yellow face. He bent over her, rubbing her shade near the wooden bridge, chill hands, and looking at her with she sees men slowly carrying sometender pity as her dark eyes opened thing, Now she is face to face on him wonderingly. He thought with them. Anthony is no longer in there might be some wine in the the Rookery; they are carrying him dining-room close by. He left the stretched on a door, and there beroom, and Caterina's eyes turned hind him is Sir Christopher, with the towards the window-towards Sir firmly-set mouth, the deathly paleChristopher's chair. There was the ness, and the concentrated expreslink at which the chain of conscious- sion of suffering in the eye, which ness had snapped, and the events of mark the suppressed grief of the the morning were beginning to recur strong man. The sight of this face, dimly like a half-remembered dream, on which Caterina had never before when Maynard returned with some beheld the signs of anguish, caused a wine. He raised her, and she drank rush of new feeling which for the it; but still she was silent, seeming moment submerged all the rest. lost in the attempt to recover the She went gently up to him, put her past, when the door opened, and Mr. little hand in his, and walked in si. Warren appeared with looks that lepce by his side. Sir Christopher announced terrible tidings. Mr. could not tell her to leave him, and Gilfil, dreading lest he should tell so she went on with that sad procesthem in Caterina's presence, hurried sion to Mr. Bates's cottage in the towards him with his finger on his Mosslands, and sat there in silence, lips, and drew him away into the waiting and watching to know if An. dining-room on the opposite side of the thony were really dead. passage.

She had not yet missed the dagger Caterina, revived by the stimu- from her pocket; she had not yet lant, was now recovering the full even thought of it. At the sight of consciousness of the scene in the Anthony lying dead, her nature had Rookery: Anthony was lying there rebounded from its new bias of redead ; she had left him to tell Sir sentment and hatred to the old Christopher; she must go and see sweet habit of love. The earliest what they were doing with him; and the longest has still the mastery perhaps he was not really dead-only over us; and the only past that in a trance ; people did fall into linked itself with those glazed untrances sometimes. While Mr. Gil. conscious eyes, was the past when fil was telling Warren how it would they beamed on her with tenderness. be best to break the news to Lady She forgot the interval of wrong and Cheverel and Miss Assher, anxious jealousy and hatred—all his cruelty, himself to return to Caterina, the and all her thoughts of revenge-as poor child had made her way feebly the exile forgets the stormy passage to the great_entrance-door, which that lay between home and happiness, stood open. Her strength increased and the dreary land in which he finds as she moved and breathed the himself desolate.

CHAPTER XVL

Before night all hope was gone. the house, and every one there knew Dr. Hart had said it was death; the calamity that bad fallen on Anthony's body had been carried to them.

Caterina had been questioned by her storms of passion, her jealousy Dr. Hart, and had answered briefly and hatred of Miss Assher, her that she found Anthony lying in the thoughts of revenge on Anthony. Rookery. That she should have been O how wicked she had been! It was walking there just at that time was she who had been sinning ; it was not a coincidence to raise conjectures she who had driven him to do and in any one besides Mr. Gilbil. Except say those things that had made her in answering this question, she had not so angry. And if he had wronged her, broken her silence. She sat mute in what had she been on the verge of a corner of the gardener's kitchen, doing to him? She was too wicked shaking her head when Maynard en- ever to be pardoned. She would like treated her to return with him, and to confess how wicked she had been, apparently unable to think of any, that they might panish her ; she thing but the possibility that An- would like to hamble herself to the thony might revive, until she saw dust before every one—before Miss them carrying away the body to the Assher even. Sir Christopher would house. Then she followed by Sir send her away-would never see her Christopher's side again, so quietly, again, if he knew all ; and she would that even Dr. Hart did not object to be happier to be punished and frownher presence.

ed on, than to be treated tenderly It was decided to lay the body in while she had that guilty secret in the library until after the coroner's her breast. But then, if Sir Chrisinquest to-morrow, and when Cate- topher were to know all, it would rina saw the door finally closed, she add to his sorrow, and make him tarned up the gallery stairs on her more wretched than ever. No! she way to her own room, the place could not confess it-she should have where she felt at home with her sor- to tell about Anthony. But she rows. It was the first time she had could not stay at the Manor ; she been in the gallery since that terrible must go away ; she could not bear moment in the morning, and now the Sir Christopher's eye, could not bear spot and the objects around began to the sight of all these things that rereawaken her half-stunned memory. minded her of Anthony and of her The armour was no longer glittering sin. Perhaps she should die soon ; in the sunlight, but there it hung she felt very feeble; there could dead and sombre above the cabinet not be much life in her. She would from which she had taken the dagger. go away and live humbly, and Yes! now it all came back to her- pray to God to pardon her, and let all the wretchedness and all the sin. her die. But where was the dagger now? She The poor child never thought of felt in her pocket; it was not there. suicide. No sooner was the storm of Could it have been her fancy-all anger passed than the tenderness and that about the dagger? She looked timidity of her nature returned, and in the cabinet; it was not there. she could do nothing but love and Alas! no ; it could not have been mourn. Her inexperience prevented her fancy, and she was guilty of that her from imagining the consequences wickedness. But where could the of her disappearance from the Manor; dagger be now? Could it have fallen she foresaw none of the terrible de out of her pocket? She heard steps tails of alarm and distress and search ascending the stairs, and hurried on that must ensue. “They will think to her room, where, kneeling by the I am dead,” she said to herself, “and bed, and burying her face to shut out by-and-by they will forget me, and the hateful light, she tried to recall Maynard will get happy again, and every feeling and incident of the love some one else." morning

She was roused from her absorp It all came back ; everything An- tion by a knock at the door. Mrs. thony had done, and everything she Bellamy was there. She had come had felt for the last month—for many by Mr. Gilfil's request to see how months—ever since that June even- Miss Sarti was, and to bring her some ing when he had last spoken to her food and wine. in the gallery. She looked back on “ You look sadly, my dear," said

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