Measuring Intelligence: Facts and Fallacies

Przednia okładka
Cambridge University Press, 26.08.2004 - 172
0 Recenzje
The testing of intelligence has a long and controversial history. Claims that it is a pseudo-science or a weapon of ideological warfare have been commonplace and there is not even a consensus as to whether intelligence exists and, if it does, whether it can be measured. As a result the debate about it has centred on the nurture versus nature controversy and especially on alleged racial differences and the heritability of intelligence - all of which have major policy implications. This book aims to penetrate the mists of controversy, ideology and prejudice by providing a clear non-mathematical framework for the definition and measurement of intelligence derived from modern factor analysis. Building on this framework and drawing on everyday ideas the author address key controversies in a clear and accessible style and explores some of the claims made by well known writers in the field such as Stephen Jay Gould and Michael Howe.
 

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Spis treści

IV
1
V
14
VI
27
VII
35
VIII
42
IX
55
X
68
XI
85
XII
96
XIII
110
XIV
126
XV
142
XVI
153
XVII
164
XVIII
168
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Informacje o autorze (2004)

David J. Bartholomew is Emeritus Professor of Statistics, London School of Economics, Fellow of the British Academy and a former president of the Royal Statistical Society. He is a member of the editorial board of various journals and has published numerous books and journal articles in the fields of statistics and social measurement.

Informacje bibliograficzne